Fake News & Media Messages Tip #5: Choose a Variety of Sources. Show your children how you get news and information from different places, and explain how you make your choices. Use words like "credible," "trustworthy," "respected," and "fair." Ask them where they get their information, and if they think about those same words when choosing. As kids get older, introduce the ideas of bias, satire, and clickbait.
over 3 years ago, EdTech@Oly
Fake News
OHS Student Council spends Saturday helping Helping Hands. If you need winter clothing, contact Kathy @ Helping Hands. They have new born through adult.
over 3 years ago, Lon Abrams
Students at Helping Hands
If a picture's worth a thousand words, do the words always tell a true story? One way to find out is through a reverse image search. Search with an image instead of a keyword and see what you discover!
over 3 years ago, EdTech@Oly
Reverse Image Search
Just a friendly reminder, the Student Council auction ends Thursday night. https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1bWd7j4dEyZl0RytDC2syMNvUklAhTCdw_-fgRYVoIME/mobilepresent?slide=id.p
over 3 years ago, Lon Abrams
Auction picture
Fake News & Media Messages Tip #3: Explore Different Sides of a Story! Use real-life examples to help kids understand how people can view the same situation with totally different perspectives. One child might experience a game on the playground as fun, while another might feel like the rules are unfair. Sibling conflict can be a great example of how two people can have wildly different opinions about the same event. With older children, talk through controversial subjects and take turns arguing for different sides to help kids understand various viewpoints.
over 3 years ago, EdTech@Oly
Fake News
Kids find and read news in lots of different ways. But studies show they're not very good at interpreting what they see. How can we help them get better? Teaching your students about the structure of online news articles is an important place to start. Video: bit.ly/OlyNMV1 Family Activity: bit.ly/OlyNMFR1
over 3 years ago, EdTech@Oly
Reading News Online
OHS Student Council sponsoring Christmas Silent Auction. All proceeds will go to fund Student Council projects. Click on the following link to access the Silent Auction: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1bWd7j4dEyZl0RytDC2syMNvUklAhTCdw_-fgRYVoIME/edit?usp=sharing.
over 3 years ago, Brandi Cooper
Slide picture
Fake news is nothing new. Check out this timeline to learn about some ways it has been utilized throughout history to influence society. Ask your family about other examples that you know of and why they were used!
over 3 years ago, EdTech@Oly
Fake News Timeline
Fake News & Media Messages Tip #2: Play "Spot The Ad" When you see advertising on TV or on a billboard, ask your children to figure out what the ad is selling. Sometimes it's obvious, and sometimes it's not. Help them explore why certain pictures, sounds, or words are used to sell certain products.
over 3 years ago, EdTech@Oly
Fake News
Learning anatomy and physiology through pig dissection!
over 3 years ago, LAURA O'DONNELL
Analyzing the pig heart.
Virtual dissection partner.
Filter Bubble Trouble! When we get news from our social media feeds, it often only tells us part of the story. Our friends -- and the website's algorithms -- tend to feed us perspectives we already agree with. Show students ways to escape the filter bubble and make sure their ideas about the world are being challenged. https://youtu.be/mh1dLvGe06Y - BBC
over 3 years ago, EdTech@Oly
Filter Bubble
Fake News & Media Messages Tip #1: Encourage Healthy Skepticism Help your children analyze the messages around them -- from toy packaging to Instagram posts to news headlines -- and question the purpose of the words and images they see. Teach kids how to use fact-checking tools like Snopes and FactCheck.org.
over 3 years ago, EdTech@Oly
Fake news
Video: bit.ly/OlyNMV2 All media comes with an author and an agenda. Help kids think critically about any media they view with critical questions that dig below the surface. And to really empower kids, have them create their own media with these same questions in mind.
over 3 years ago, EdTech@Oly
5 Essential Questions
Thank you Mr. Jones and Mrs. Litwiller for bringing the OHMS staff a little holiday treat - Grinch style! Much appreciated!
over 3 years ago, LAURA O'DONNELL
The Grinch cart of goodies!
With so much media and information coming at us through the television, phones, social media, and more, it's more important than ever for kids to understand the basics of media literacy. When kids can identify different types of news and media and the methods and meanings behind them, they're on their way to being critical thinkers and smart consumers. Throughout the month, we will be sharing a set of five tips to help your children become critical thinkers of news and media. Here is a short video to get those conversations started! bit.ly/OlyNMV5
over 3 years ago, EdTech@Oly
Fake News
Make sure to check out your Skyward Family Access Wall for the updated return to learn metrics and a letter from Dr. O'Donnell.
over 3 years ago, Sean Mullins
Return to learn
Social media offers a chance to choose how we present ourselves to the world. We can snap and share a pic in the moment or carefully stage photos and select only the ones we think are best. Listen as students reflect on how this impacts their lives. Video: bit.ly/Oly2DFV4
over 3 years ago, EdTech@Oly
Who are you
Check out this short video for your elementary kiddos around what a digital footprint really means. We already have K-5 students posting and interacting online, so let's start some good habits early! bit.ly/OlyDFV2
over 3 years ago, EdTech@Oly
Digital Trail
Mr. Jones visited OHS teachers during their planning day to deliver some freshly popped popcorn. Thank you Mr. Jones for popping in and delivering snacks to the staff!
over 3 years ago, LAURA O'DONNELL
Mr. Jones popping in to treat teachers.
Article Time! How Colleges Use Kids' Social Media Feeds. Learn how what you post can hurt - and help - the admissions process. https://www.commonsensemedia.org/blog/how-colleges-use-kids-social-media-feeds
over 3 years ago, EdTech@Oly
College